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INTERFACE REVIEWS >>>


Body Flow - EP 2010
Side-Line Magazine
A Different Drum
Blackvector (Sweden)
Reflections of Darkness (Germany)
Alternation (Poland)
Gothtronic (Netherlands)

Visions of Modern Life - 2009
Side-Line
A Different Drum
Blackvector (Sweden)
Reflections of Darkness (Germany)
Philly Goth Industrial

Destination Focus - EP 2008
Side-Line
A Different Drum
ReGen
PoweredByNoise
Gothtronic
Chain DLK

Beyond Humanity v2.0 - CD 2006
Chain DLK
Side-Line
A Different Drum
Gothic Paradise
Synthpop.net
Gothtronic
Virus Magazine
DJ Copper Top

Beyond Humanity (demo) - CD 2005
Chain DLK
RemixWars

 

 

REVIEWS

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Body Flow - EP

Side-Line Magazine
If there had to be a definitive track from the full length that had to be made into an EP the track "body flow" is the best candidate. This EP features remixes by recent legends and various up and coming artists, most of the newer artists featured are from within the walls of NYC. Each remix represents the remixers flavor on the interface sound; there are no bad tracks . He took the time to create and give us one solid full length, so why not do the same for the accompanying EP's . Definitely one of the best acts to grace us within the past few years! (DJ23:9) ---DJ Twenty-Three, Side-Line Magazine
A Different Drum
Interface has become one of the better selling futurepop / industrial dance bands sold at A Different Drum, and now they have a new single loaded with remixes of their edgy track, "Body Flow". It includes remixes by Level 2.0, Aesthetic Perfection, Sebastian Komor (Icon of Coil, etc.), and others, plus an exclusive track called "Neuromantic". ---Todd, A Different Drum

Blackvector
Followed from the previous releases “Destination/Focus” and “Transit”, Interface is back in 2010 with a new EP, “Body Flow”, which is the third and final single taken from their latest album “Visions Of Modern Life”. “Body Flow” features a single version of the title track but also remixes from Aesthetic Perfection, Sebastian Komor and labelmates Level 2.0 to name a few together with the unreleased track “Neuromantic” to cover eight songs and almost 40 minutes in playtime.

The single version opens up the EP and it starts with a soft breeze, other then that there isn’t a big difference compared to the album version except the lenght. The pounding beats and infectious melodic structure this track offers is amazing. If you’ve heard their latest album you know what I’m talking about. Level 2.0, the latest signing on Nilaihah Records, delivers a remix with their heavy futurepop sound while the remix from Aesthetic Perfection is a bit heavier but yet very melodic with great synthetic soundscapes. The always working Sebastian Komor has contributed with a remix and it sounds a bit different from the other. Starting with electric guitar sounds together with the voice from Eric the remix is very experimental and some similarities can be drawn with one of his other projects Zombie Girl.

“Neuromantic” is the only b-side on the single surrounded by all remixes which is dedicated to William Gibson and his legendary Neuromancer. It’s very different from any other Interface song and doesn’t sound like any other. Except the samples, the song is instrumental and very experimental. Followed is three more remixes of “Body Flow”. The Cyanide Regime remix offers a really cool structure and the soundscapes and atmosphere it delivers is outstanding. The Alter Der Ruine remix sounds pretty strange, though I liked the blip-blop of this C64 sound which kinda reminded me of the classic game Bubble Bobble. The last remix is from Cervello Elettronico and is by far the most experimental one with heavy noise structure and ’scrappy’ sounds.

Seven remixes of the same track can feel like a couple of remixes too many, but more or less every remix is great and offers much variation with each bands own unique creation. As I see it, “Body Flow” is the best track from their latest album “Visions Of Modern Life” and is absolutely the right choice of track to release as a single. Though I feel there is one or two additional tracks missing since seven remixes of the same track can be a little too much. All fans should definately get this one and if this band is new for you and something you wanna check out, I recommend to get the album first.---Bjorn, Blackvector

Reflections of Darkness
New York based INTERFACE, a creation of Eric Eldredge, has released four albums so far. The second EP, 'Body Flow', is very danceable Future-Pop with strong EBM, trance and Synth-Pop influences. The title track 'Body Flow' has enormous dance floor potential. It is such a well-made and well-produced hit that it almost comes off as calculated. The synths in the chorus bring to mind Code 64's 'Leaving Earth' from 2005 that still fills the dance floors, while the distorted vocals are typical to harsher EBM.

A few of the remixes on the EP are worth mentioning: Aesthetic Perfection's version is a bit harsher and - if possible - even more danceable take on the 'Body Flow'. While Cervello Elettronico's metallic sounds are simultaneously fresh and reminiscent of old-school industrial the most original version is that of Sebastian Komor: The guitars give the track a whole different twist that makes it stick out from the rest of the crowd.

Besides 'Body Flow' and whopping six remixes of it, there is only one additional track, 'Neuromantic', an instrumental piece complemented with spoken passages from William Gibson's cyberpunk classic 'Neuromancer'. Unfortunately, this track carries a serious case of B-side syndrome: It is weaker and less interesting than 'Body Flow' and the listener is left with the feeling it does not really kick off during its whole five-minute duration. Another song or two would have made the release appealing for larger audience, but in its current form, it is interesting mostly for hardcore fans and DJ's looking for novel dance floor fillers. --Hemi Malkki, Reflections of Darkness

Alternation
New York's Interface combines elements of darker EBM, trance, and industrial, all with a melodic, emotional edge. Body Flow is the third and final single from Interface's best-selling album 'Visions of Modern Life.' New York's Interface combines elements of darker EBM, trance, and industrial, all with a melodic, emotional edge. Body Flow is the third and final single from Interface's best-selling album 'Visions of Modern Life.' This 8-track EP focusing around the track "Body Flow" and features exclusive remixes by Aesthetic Perfection, Sebastian Komor, Alter Der Ruine and more. Despite many bands seeing dwindled physical sales of newer releases, Nilaihah Record's own Interface defies the norm! With increased CD sales for their latest full length, 'Visions of Modern Life' (since their last full length 'Beyond Humanity'), Interface proves they are becoming a more powerful force in the Industrial scene. The musical growth, technical abilities and live performances of this band are impressive to say the least! They seem to effortlessly show that hard work, dedication and excellent songs really do make a difference. Released on Nilaihah and available March 30th, 2010. --Schizev, Alternation: Altermusic Magazine

Gothtronic
Interface releases an EP centered around the powerful futurepop EBM track 'Body Flow' taken from their latest album Visions of Modern Life. A guaranteed floorfiller for the clubs. This track is next to the single version, featured in a whole bunch of remixes on this EP. The best remixes are the danceable version of Aesthetic Perfection and the guitar version of Sebastian Komor. The bonus track this time is 'Neuromantic', an instrumental track featuring spoken word fragments that refer to the cyberpunk novel Neuromancer by William Gibson. Since there are no other extra tracks added this EP is only interesting for the real fan of Interface. --TekNoir, Gothtronic

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Visions of Modern Life - CD

Side-Line Magazine
It would seem the prediction in the EP review was dead balls on! This release is twice as good as the last and this act has definitely found THEIR voice. Where as in the predecessor full length each song sounded like a different influence, here they have all been smashed apart and reconstructed into something that sounds like what Interface should. Each track has the potential to crush any dance floor. There is a slight drop in the middle of the release for some experimenting with more than playing with a straight 4/4 on the floor beat all the way through. [However], each track is a pleasant surprise! This release is destined to become an instant classic and is a great solid release to kick off the new year. Within all this fun, there are two remixes at the end of the disc for the two tracks that should be spun immediately by any DJ. Dare one say that Interface is the next band to wear the moniker of "futurepop" with the varied moods and sounds expressed in this release, as well as the deep meaningful lyrics that will touch anyone, because somebody out there has felt the same way at one time or another. (DJ23:9)

A Different Drum
After the popular "Destination Focus" CDEP, the new Interface full-length album is released! It's packed with VNV Nation-esque futurepop music aimed at the dance club. Driving bass lines and thudding beats keep a steady pulse throughout. Perhaps it is not necessarily ground-breaking, but it is well executed and a solid release for those who love the blend of edgy synthpop and intense industrial dance music

Blackvector
After the highly successful album "Beyond Humanity" from 2005, the one-man army of Eric Eldredge and his project Interface is back in 2009 with his fourth album "Visions Of Modern Life". The album covering 13 new tracks with 53 minutes of great danceable electronic music.

"Visions Of Modern Life" starts with an intro simply called "Entry" and then drives off with the track "Voices". This track appears two times on the album, as this first version is called Mono. Driving heavy beats, catchy hooklines, just like the recognizable trademark of Interface. Followed is "Destination", who also was released as an EP before the album. With the next track I was a bit surpised... ehrm, 'a bit' would be wrong to say about it. 'Much' would be a more fitting word. "Modern Life" shows a new side from Interface, at least from what I've heard. The track is dark and the heaviness is raised by 200% compared with other tracks, and not to talk about the inescapable dance factor this track offers. With pounding beats and in fact that the track is almost instrumental with only a voice singing "This is a modern life" from time to time, makes the track unescapable from the dancefloors.

"Transit" is the complete opposite. Even though the track is a danceable track in the vein of the typical Interface-song, it includes elements mostly recognizable with tunes from the recognizable old computer systems like C64 or Amiga. "Pavilion" is the first slow track and I think the atmosphere that this track comprise is refreshingly and beautiful with its distinct and heavy beats and great soundscapes. "Body Flow" is probably my favorite track. It breathes life into your body with its great structure of pounding beats and infectious hooklines. It's addictive and as soon you've heard the chorus it WILL get stuck in your head. The second version of "Visions" is named Echo and as with "Modern Life" it has this heaviness I talk about with a powerful strike right to your chest with the bass. But that is not what catches your attention in this version. Instead of Eric on vocals it features the voice of female singer Dawn Mitchell and this together with its beat structure, it gives the song a completely different approach and does not sound like the Mono-version.

The album is great in every way and a must-have for all fans of modern electronic music. It offers a great experience with dancefloor fillers like "Modern Life" or "Body Flow", slower tracks like "Paranoia's Lullaby" and experimental pieces like "Corridor V.2" or "Antarctica".

"Visions Of Modern Life" is a respectable and very enjoyable electro album with great production work making this Interface' best work to date. ---Björn, Blackvector.se

Reflections of Darknesss
INTERFACE combines elements of darker EBM, trance, and industrial, all with a melodic, emotional edge. And now, New York's INTERFACE is back and stronger than ever! Founded by Eric Eldredge in 1993, INTERFACE has created a strong, diverse sound on its releases: 'The Artemis Complex' (1999), 'Angels in Disguise' (2002), 'Beyond Humanity' (2006), 'Destination Focus' (2008) and 'Visions of Modern Life' (2009). It has developed from hard industrial to dance floor compatible songs, soft ballads and even ambient. Eric is also acting in the remix market, lending INTERFACE's name to well known artists, and has been commended by the scene-press for its work.

The fourth full-length album reflects yet another positive turn in its career. This album only serves to continue the growth and evolution of INTERFACE. Thirteen songs of mature and introspective lyrics, lush Synth textures, and club-ready beats make for the next evolution in the band's sound. Already previewed on its own EP, 'Destination' appears at full length here, alongside more standout tracks like the hard-hitting 'Body Flow' or 'Modern Life', and slower works like 'Pavilion'. It even includes an updated version of 'Corridor', a track that was written onstage in 1999 and recorded in 2000. Transit EP follows also in 2009 - the second single from 'Visions of Modern Life', 'Transit' appears here in 3 new forms - a 'Radio Mix', then club mixes by INTERFACE itself and by XP8. Rounding out the single is the driving instrumental 'Control'.

In 2010, the Body Flow EP appears - 'Body Flow' is the third and final single from INTERFACE's best-selling album 'Visions of Modern Life'. It is available on CD - limited to 500 copies - and in download outlets stores. The B-side of the single is 'Neuromantic', a mostly instrumental song which is a musical tribute to the novel Neuromancer by William Gibson. --Janine Szakacs, Reflections of Darkness

Philly Goth Industrial
Don’t push “shuffle,” and don’t push “pause.” This album is best when listened from start to finish.

The new album from the New York based band Interface is a terrific example of good industrial music coming out of the US. When you can listen to an album in its entirety and not feel the urge to skip a track, you know you’ve got a clear winner. I could imagine “Visions of Modern Life,” as a soundtrack for a movie. Unlike a lot of albums that seem to have no thought given to the order of the tracks, this album has a definite beginning, middle and end.

It begins with an atmospheric intro track called “Entry” to set the mood, and then takes you on an action-filled excursion for the next several tracks. I could close my eyes and almost see the characters, the scenes and the intense action-thriller style plot forming as I immersed my ears into the depths of each track. A certain theme develops, as the album title indicates, I felt I was “seeing life” from different perspectives.

Halfway through the album, there is what appears to be an intermission; a short, soundscape track called “Antarctica,” followed by a slower, moody track called “Pavilion,” which interestingly contains a small sample from "Voyager" by the Alan Parsons Project. Thereafter we’re thrown back into the fast-paced action. I take note of the lyrics in, “Indecision,” which further enforces my inclination to imagine a story, as if the character is in some kind of turmoil, “To take the next step or to weather the storm, to doubt if your choices are truly informed..” Also worth mentioning is the track I predict will be a club hit, “Body Flow,” with its perfect dance rhythm and shout-able chorus.

Not unlike a movie, we end our story in calm… with one of the more beautiful ballads I’ve heard lately, “Paranoia’s Lullaby,” with its deep and interesting lyrics, tender symphonic keyboards and melodic vocals. While each track takes on a personality and “plot” of its own, you’re left with the feeling of unity and continuity, a finished piece.

Q and A with Interface’s Eric Eldredge (Vocals, Programming, and Production)

What is your earliest memory of playing music?
I’ve been playing music my whole life! I came from a musical household – both my brothers are also musicians.

Name your top 5 influences:
This is pretty tough as I’m influenced by an awful lot of different artists and genres. I’d have to sat my largest ones are Depeche Mode, New Order, Kraftwerk, Nitzer Ebb, Front 242… I think I could go on all day!

What band would you like to tour with?
I’m not picky – someone in our genre will do!

How did the members of Interface meet?
My live lineup has been a little fluid lately, but it’s most often been Jon, Joe, and Justin. Jon’s been playing with the band since 1999 – he tried out after another band I had hooked him up with hadn’t worked out. Joe did a lot of work on my songs going back to Beyond Humanity, and has been playing onstage since 2006. I knew Justin from college and he came on in 2007.

From your new album “Visions Of Modern Life”, what is your favorite track and why?
Wow, to choose just one… Each of these songs has had a lot more personal meaning to me than previous ones. Maybe the way that “Destination” came together – I had that one written and ready to be recorded in just over an hour. It always thrills me when I create something so fast that is pretty much finished. “Wasted Time” was pretty much the same way years ago.

What are your touring plans?
We have a few things in the works that I can’t jump the gun over, but soon enough I should have an announcement!

What does your family and friends think of your music?
I’d like to think they’re pretty supportive.

These tracks have interesting lyrics, can you tell us the meanings behind any of them?
Well, each song on this album, as the title says, has some sort of “snapshot” of living life in today’s world. I can give you the meanings of a few of them. “Voices” deals with following your own path versus the path set by others. “Transit” is about the routine of everyday life killing your dreams and aspirations. “Pavilion” deals with meeting someone, clicking with them, sharing a brief experience with them, and never seeing them again after that night. “Paranoia’s Lullaby” is what difficulty I imagine parents have at telling their children that things will work out for the future in these times.

What has been the band’s proudest moment?
I think it’s the chances I’ve gotten to work with some of the larger names in the industry, as when I remixed Lacuna Coil recently, or having some of the big name remixes I’ve gotten of my own stuff. Overall, I think the opening slot for the Human League on 2003 was pretty special – they were an enormous influence on me when I was young.

Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
I hope to eventually tour the US and Europe in full, and finally reach the fans I’ve made in everywhere possible. I’d also like to get more towards different musical challenges, like scoring for example. The EBM thing can’t last forever, I’m sure!

The full-length album “Visions of Modern Life” is available now. The first 200 copies sold on www.nilaihah.com will also include a bonus; the band’s Transit EP. The band were recently commissioned to work on a remix of the Lacuna Coil track “I Like It” for an upcoming release.(4 of 5) ---DJ Candy Durant - Philly Goth Industrial ________________________________________________________________________


Destination Focus - EP

Side-Line Magazine
One of the many bands to come speeding out of NYC within the past few years has finally released a new EP. From the very intro of the title track of this EP you can tell this band is finding their voice. This release has a more leveled off sound the preceding full length instead of being reminiscent of it's possible influence this represents what the Interface sound now is and what it is becoming. A great EP for any DJ to have to pack a floor and will leave your mouth watering in anticipation for the full length. -9/10 rating- --Review by DJ23 for www.sideline.com

A Different Drum
This is a new CD single featuring four versions of the new futurepop anthem "Destination", including mixes by Code 64, State of the Union, and Mindless Faith, plus three other bonus songs. For people who love the pumped sounds of bands like Icon of Coil, VNV Nation, etc. then this fits right in.

ReGen Magazine
Interface's sound climbs to previously uncharted heights with this engrossing and highly dance-driven EP. Much as its name implies, this release goes well beyond what listeners have come to expect from Interface. This act's material has always been technically brilliant, but the emotional element frequently seemed to be somewhat lacking. In contrast, Destination Focus does not hesitate to bring its audience along for a wild ride through sounds and beats that pay close attention to creating the buildup and the corresponding catharsis that marks truly great music, whatever the genre. The electronic wizardry is much more advanced in this EP, with layers that are not only more carefully crafted, but are blended together in a way that is thoroughly absorbing and entrancing.

The four different versions of "Destination" are all excellent, each evoking the epic intensity that makes a song memorable and fills a dance floor time and time again. The single version revives the smooth, streamlined electronic sound that fans of Interface have come to expect, but with an edgy drive that really does have the touch of adventure and excitement implied by the name of the song. The State of the Union remix is incredible, with long breaks that add pomp and drama to the already impressive formula. The Code 64 remix takes things in a more playful synthpop direction, while the Mindless Faith remix is hard and heavy. The additional new songs are equally if not more memorable than the title track. With "Northstar," the beat comes in hard and strong and is soon accompanied by vocals that have a slightly electric lilt, causing them to come across as more subdued while the fierce and many-layered electronics take center stage. "Inferno" may be the most aggressive track that Interface has ever put out, with a crushing introduction of long, descending synths that dive into an unstoppable progression of beats. "After Hours" creates yet another mood that is uncharacteristic of Interface, this time a slightly playful vocal delivery matched by synths that seem to be divided between enigmatic and wistful, though the two feelings increasingly come together and flow with mutual conviction as the end comes nearer in sight.

Interface has noticeably moved to the next level with Destination Focus. Those familiar with previous material will be impressed and newcomers will be blown away. Anyone into electronic dance music that refuses to be dismissed as background noise and cannot help but steal center stage should check this out! --Review by Dillon Carlyon for www.regen.com

PoweredByNoise
Two years after their last full length release, Interface return with the Destination Focus EP. “Destination” is a very strong song vocally. Eric’s delivery is solid and the chorus hooks into your brain and keeps going long after the song is over. There are three remixes of “Destination” and are all worth inclusion on this disc. The State of the Union remix is the strongest in my opinion, it’s got a thicker sonic feel to it without being too muddy. Mindless Faith puts their spin on the title track as well adding their signature sound from their Momentum CD, listening to this remix it’s evident as to the artist responsible. The Code 64 remix is a bit quicker in tempo than the original and has a brighter, crisper and more synthetic feel to it with the instrumentation coming off very video-game like especially in the lead line between verse and chorus. “Inferno“, an instrumental track, has strong elements of early techno and trance and feels like it would fit well in a warehouse party with thousands of people moving to an endless beat. It definitely carries the energy found in early Icon of Coil dancefloor hits. “North Star” sounds reminiscent of early Neuroticfish and could easily be a strong single on it’s own. “After Hours” begins with a bubbling synth line and a sparse vocal line. I’m slightly reminded of the opening for Stromkern’s cover of “Anthrax”, though “After Hours” is much more chill and lacks any aggressive qualities. The “Destination Focus” EP is hopefully an indication of the quality we can expect from the next full length. If this proves to be the case it’s been well worth the wait.

Review by DJ Rift for www.poweredbynoise.com

Gothtronic
The American futurepop electro band Interface is back in the frontlines with a new MCD named Destination Focus. The first sounds of ‘Destination’ immediately remind of the sound of the Dutch futurepop electro band Angels & Agony from some years ago and this impression doesn’t disappear with the other tracks on this EP, ‘North Star’, ‘Inferno’ and ‘After Hours’. Not bad, well done but it does sound somewhat dated in 2008 when you can trace back the sounds of another band from a couple of years ago. A bit of a letdown thus, moreover since Interface has delivered better material in the past, like the ingenious track ‘Age of Computers’ from the album Beyond Humanity from 2006. Of the ‘Destination’ track this MCD contains remixes by State of the Union , Code 64 and Mindless Faith. A nice collection of subtop names from the electro world, but unfortunately these remixes are not that surprising or anything special either. State of the Union draws the song even more towards futurepop territory whilst using some excellent sounds and making the song even more danceable. Code 64 tries to give the song a twist of their own sound but doesn’t achieve in that which makes the song a bit too synthetic in sound. Mindless Faith does manage to add an extra dimension and this is also the most accomplished remix of the ‘Destination’ track. The song ‘North Star’ is like you see more often actually a much better song than the title track of this MCD, and it is also sung with much more emotion. ‘Inferno’ is nothing special and ‘After Hourts’ is a nice experiment with its minimal techno touch and again strong vocals. Interface doesn’t completely deliver with this MCD, despite some nice moments and this is a bit disappointing since the band has delivered more consistent work than this in their past. www.gothtronic.com by Teknoir

Chain DLK

Interface- Long Island, New York Synthpop/Futurepop band that’s been around for quite a long time, since 1993 in fact. They sound kind of like Information Society, De/Vision, Psyche, Seabound, Neuropa, The Echoing Green, Underwater Pilots and a host of others in the genre. They’ve been on a number of comps (Cryonica, A Different Drum, Alfa Matrix, etc.), have half a dozen releases including this one to their credit, and an upcoming full album release in 2009. In 2005 they hooked up with Nilaihah Records, probably a good move for them. TTo their credit, hey seem to maintain a pretty active profile in spite of about 20 other bands having the same name.

On this 7 track EP, there are 5 versions of the title track- “Destination”. First is the single version, then the “State of the Union Remix”, the “Code 64 Remix”, the “Mindless Faith Remix” and “North Star”. The song is basically straight-ahead futurepop with a generically memorable hook- (“I will be your destination, I am the promised land, You will be my inspiration, you make me understand”) and a strong dance beat. Vocals done in a clean, minimally processed fashion (a bit of chorusing). Typical elements in the single version- futurepop synths, sequencing, a dash of vocoder for accents. The “State of the Union Remix” is a bit heavier than the single version, eliminates the synth excepting the bass on the verses, and pumps up the synth hook on the chorus, and the vocoder. The “Code 64 Remix” begins with a strong synth bass, rearranges the synth parts on the verses (from none on the first verse, to a fuller sequenced pad on the second) before the first chorus, which is handed off to female vocalist Rachel Feder. She gets only minimal string and a hyperactive bass backing for her solo vocal. This is quickly followed by a Casio-like sequenced melody carrying back into the refrain with vocals handed back off to Interface’s Eric Elredge. Another Casio-ish synth counter-melody emerges briefly. This is probably the weakest track on the CD. The “Mindless Faith Remix” might be the heaviest remix but it’s so junked up with sonic effluvia that it sounds distorted. Call it industrial, whatever. It does offer more open spaces which might be a good thing for the dancefloor but (DJs be warned) shaky soundsystems are gonna cry uncle over this one.

“North Star” is nothing more than “Destination” without any chorus hook in it all and a lot of busy sequencing. “Inferno” reminds me a bit of Covenant in the beat and synth departments, and might have been pretty good if there was a song in there somewhere, but I couldn’t find one. Still, it might make good dancefloor fodder. “After Hours” is the final and quirkiest track on the EP, and offers something a little different than the 6 dance oriented tracks that precede it- mid tempo with a repeated vocal refrain about drifting away, swathed in a cloud of ‘verb and echo and an off-kilter synth line.

So what’s the final verdict? First, if you’ve never read my reviews before, don’t get the impression that I don’t like Synthpop and Futurepop because I do, when it’s original and engaging. The problem is here, that the featured song here sounds a bit genre-generic and the remixes aren’t all that compelling. Passable dancefloor fodder, but unless you’re a DJ (and they usually get copies gratis) what’s the point? Yes, it’s competent and well-produced, but for 8 bucks (or more!) I’d pass. Maybe if it was half-price it might be worth it for the “Inferno” Covenant-style instrumental track. You could add in your own vocal track and send it back to the band. They might even be amused. Hopefully their upcoming 2009 full album will have a lot more to offer than what I’ve heard here. www.chainDLK.com - Steve Mecca

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Beyond Humanity v2.0 - CD

Virus Magazine
...this CD will definitely find favor with club patrons and those who like to move their booty.

Review by Virus-Magazine
 

Gothtronic
The long-awaited follow-up to their 2002 breakthrough "Angels in Disguise" was recorded entirely in the computer environment, and reflects a more focused and aggressive sound than its predecessor while retaining founder Eric Eldredge's melody and songwriting touch.

Review by Gothtronic

Synthdicate (Russian Page and letters)
To read the review of this page, please follow the LINK.

Chain DLK
Beyond Humanity, the third album from New York-based Interface, offers a refreshing earful of forward-thinking, futuristic electro-pop. This highly-charged melodic escapade expands outward from its understated opening track, “Gravity,” accelerating from zero to sixty in the blink of an eye. Staccato beats and fluid arpeggios sizzle around the vocoded articulations of singer Eric Eldredge as “Age of Computers” kicks into high gear. “Mind Killer” shows off the programming and arrangement skills of Eldredge and band mate Jon Billian, as this highly infectious dance track palpitates like a heart on the verge of infarction! The place slows a bit on “Wonderland,” but cranks back up again on “Despair,” a repetitious but energetic instrumental. “Stranger in a Strange Land” incorporates samples and some nicely executed vocal melodies in a very palatable fashion. The vocoder returns on the title track, “Beyond Human,” along with some very familiar, euphonic retro beats and effects – musically and thematically, one must believe there’s a nod to techno godfathers Kraftwerk in here somewhere! “Insomniac” slams on the breaks, its slow, flowing beat giving it a much darker sheen than the rest of the album. “Nobody’s Hero” is definitely a cut above, and should emerge as a dance floor favorite for club goers this summer. “Faith in Nothing” closes out the album nicely, though I had to laugh while listening to the chorus, as I was reminded of the nihilists from “The Big Lebowski” – we believe in nothing! As this is an Expanded Edition, six additional remix tracks (some from deleted releases on the now-dormant Tinman record label) have been included on the disc. Contributors to this effort include Assemblage 23, Stromkern, Combichrist, Imperative Reaction, and DJ Sean Tyas. “Clear Night,” remixed here by Sean Tyas, originally appeared on 2002’s “Angels in Disguise.” “Doubts and Fears,” an 80’s new-wave influenced track originally available via the internet, was previously only available in CD format on the “State of Synthpop 2005” 5-disc set. The other remixes feature songs from this album that sound significantly different from the originals, making for a really nice mixture of styles. Jump on this!

Review by Ian Hall for Chain DLK

Side-Line
Hailing from the brighter parts of NYC comes interface . This act has elements of EBM from bands of past and present , from vocal effects like KRAFTWERK to the thumping kicks like RETROSIC , and the funkier percussions of a Daniel Myer project . Their influences can be heard throughout the album (if one were to listen carefully) mixed with their own style . Random movie clips are inserted in various tracks but don't obstruct or take away from the songs . The cd comes right into your face with the song "Age Of Computers" and makes you want to dance right away.  The track "Despair" an instrumental has elements of all good things EBM and trance mixed in . a great darker track "Mind killer" is made for the dance floor , with great synth lines ,  harsh vocals followed with the angry kick so you can make your expansive personal space on the dance floor . "Beyond Human" has many elements of a good KRAFTWERK song mixed with new EBM flavor . "Nobody's Hero" storms at you with all the things that make up a great FUNKER VOGT dance track . Also on the cd are remixes by bands such as ASSEMBLAGE 23 , COMBICHRIST , IMPERATIVE REACTION and STROMKERN . All the songs bring something a little different to the table from hard ebm to synthpop elements and anyone should enjoy this album .

Review by Side-Line

 

A Different Drum
Interface "Beyond Humanity" -- This new album by Interface presents a collection of pounding electro-dance tracks that cross over from the electro-industrial dance audience to the hard-edged synthpop fans.  Some of the vocals are covered with fuzzy effects, but quite often the voice is left clear, though still rough around the edges.  This is a cool release for future pop fans as well.  Plus, after the 10 regular album tracks, you get another 6 bonus remix tracks to keep the beat pumping even longer, including mixes by similar bands like Assemblage 23, Stromkern, Imperative Reaction, etc.

Review by A Different Drum


Gothic Paradise
Even though this is the first time many of us have heard of the band Interface, this is actually their third full-length album. On Nilaihah Records it comes presented as the "Expanded Edition" which contains ten solid original tracks and six bonus tracks that would have probably been released as a separate single in other circumstances. I always think this is a nice approach to have them bundled onto one disc since the days of buying a "single" in the store is a thing of the past with the digital music revolution and being able to buy single tracks at a music download site. However I still think the best albums and bands are those that can package an entire disc in such a way that it's good enough that it's best to listen to in it's entirety. And with this album they manage to pull it together well in that sense.

The album starts with a short, spatial ambient intro with some sci-fi post-apocalyptic spoken word samples and then jumps right into the pounding beats and futuristic theme with "Age of Computers". The vocoded vocals are a nice touch on this track giving it that mechanical and over-the-top digital feeling (or lack of feeling). However, the melodic vocals interspersed between the mechanical gives the track a human touch and should really please synthpop fans. This theme of Beyond Humanity remains strong throughout the album providing a cohesive theme and smooth transition between tracks making the entire album nice to listen to. A few tracks have various samples included which add some nice accents to each piece. "Mind Killer" builds on this feature and some harsher vocals and heavy bass and beats for another excellent dance track that has quickly become a favorite on this disc. This heavier, more aggressive tone and harsh vocals is actually more of the exception, which is nice in today's onslaught of vocals that sound like the vocalist has gargled gasoline.

Adding some nice variety to the album are the mid-tempo pieces "Wonderland" and "Insomniac" with a heavy, but smooth trip-hop beat and non-distorted vocals. "Stranger in a Strange Land" also moves away from the industrial edge with some smooth, melodic synth loops and clear vocals. We're also treated with a moving instrumental piece "Despair" which builds on some solid synth loops and dance-friendly beats. And really moving into another realm is "Beyond Human" which takes the name to a new level with all computerized vocals while the music creates a moving, dance-friendly atmosphere. And to wrap up the original tracks on the album is the track "Faith in Nothing" which jumps back into the harder edged industrial rhythms and slight distortion. This powerful piece provides a nice ending to the regular album tracks ending on a strong note.

The bonus material presented include two mixes of "Age of Computers" by Assemblage 23 and Imperative Reaction. Stromkern lends their unique flavor to "Wasted Time" and Combichrist pumps up the intensity with a remix of "Faith in Nothing". "Clear Night" appears as a bonus piece, this version a remix by Sean Tyas. The original versions of both "Clear Night" and "Wasted Time" originally appear on the band's 2002 album Angels in Disguise. The 2004 internet-only track appears here as the finale to the album presenting the heavy 80's new wave influence that is so catchy and makes a great way to wrap up the album. All of these bonus pieces are really great. I'm not always a huge fan of remixes, or singles with tons of remixed tracks, but each of these are done really well, so I have to say that this album comes highly recommended for electronic music fans.

Gothic Paradise


Synthpop.net
This is Interface's third full-length album, here released in a expanded edition that includes 6 bonus tracks taken from previous limited EP's and singles. The album was released in 2006 on Nilaihah Records, more than ten years after the inception of the band in 1993. Interface is made up of Eric Eldridge (everything) and Jon Billian, keyboardist, and is based in New York. The musical style presented on this album is dark EBM and Industrial, with enough pop elements blended in to make the music accessible.

The opening track, "Genesis", begins with a eerily desolate musical landscape, which is then joined by a disturbing sample from the movie Equilibrium. "Age Of Computers" follows, and this track seems tailor made to be a anthem for those involved in the technical profession. Not only that, it's a excellent dance track as well, and the remixes by Assemblage23 and Imperative Reaction only serve to emphasize that fact.

Thankfully, that's not the sole highlight of the disc. The hard-edged EBM of "Mindkiller" immediately follows "Age Of Computers", and shortly thereafter is the excellent club track "Despair". "Stranger In A Strange Land" is probably the most synthpop-oriented track on the disc, but that isn't a negative comment at all - more of a reflection of how many styles this disc successfully incorporates along the way. "Beyond Human" has very Kraftwerkian vocal effect used throughout, but the modern EBM music style keeps the track feeling very fresh. The non-remix portion of the disc closes with "Nobody's Hero" and "Faith In Nothing", both excellent EBM tracks.

Just about all the remixes are also outstanding. The "Faith In Nothing" remix seemed to tip the scales just a bit too far in regard to the original song versus new elements. Other than that one issue, this is a great crop of remixes, and add a lot of value to the album. I think that if you enjoy bands such as Endanger or Namnambulu, but prefer a more EBM slanted approach, you'll love this disc. I know I do.

Jason Baker @ Synthpop.net


Chain DLK
Unbelievable that this band is currently not signed! After the demise of their label Tinman which quits its business in the last year, this band is looking until today for a new and professional label. And with music like on this new full length CD "Beyond Humanity", I would like to advise the management of this band to contact the best and biggest labels of the scene. This release is currently self-produced, but it needs to be heard in all corners of this world! I am normally not to much into music somewhere placed in genres like Synth-, Future- or Electropop, but here I have received an unbelievable exception. They have also supported ASSEMBLAGE 23 on parts of his "Storm" tour, and I am sure that a lot of you out there saw on stage. "Beyond Humanity" is simply the best album out of this genres I have heard for a long time. People like mostly comparisons, so I would say that INTERFACE produce a fine mixture between A23 and CUT.RATE.BOX ("The Age Of Computers", "Faith in Nothing" ) with the tendency on the harder tracks (like "Mind Killer", or the dark "Insomniac") to get compared with the Australian ANGEL THEORY. The vocals are of course mostly clear and smooth and luckily not to much placed in the foreground. On some tracks they also integrate some cool KRAFTWERKian vocoder effects, especially on "Beyond Human". There is also an outstanding instrumental piece here with "Despair", and the band can enjoy with some well worked out melodic synth pads. My favorite next to the harder "Mind Killer" is the dancefloor smasher "Nobody’s Hero" with an unbeatable refrain and outstanding melodic synth play. If music done by the mentioned acts is your style you should hurry up now and start to purchase this one. Again - this band is currently not signed - labels, wake up and make your contacts!

Marc Tater @ Chain DLK


RemixWars
The third album from Interface arrives finally after a long 3 year wait since Angels In Disguise in July 2002. The album begins with a moody sample taken from the film Equilibrium, setting the futuristic and somewhat dystopian theme of the album as seen from the full opening track The Age of Computers, its a strong dancey number that should be popular on the dancefloors. The next track is the first display of the harder Funker Vogt-ish feeling of some of the tracks here. Wonderland is a slower paced tune that really displays the bands song writing skills, it would work well in acoustic form with just guitar and vocal. Track 5 - Despair, is an instrumental ending in a nice uplifting almost euphoric trance style. The albums title track Beyond Human continues the futuristic theme with heavily vocoded Kraftwerkian voice accompanyied by electro beeps and moving again into a straighforward almost euphoric trance for the second half. It can appear to be an odd mix if you arent famililar with the genre, with some loving the first half but not the final half because of the change into openly trance influenced coming into effect so sharply. More science fiction theming in Stranger In A Strange Land, another slower paced track about change, the fear of it and its necessity. Track 8 - Insomniac is the albums weakest track for me with just not alot happening in it. Nobody"s Hero could be a long lost Funker Vogt track as it follows that bands style and construction pretty much perfectly but here thankfully the band didnt remake this track 10 times for the album. The similarity is apparently accidental including the name having no relation to FV"s Tragic Hero or Fallen Hero. Faith In nothing, the penultimate track should again have the dancefloors filled everywhere without too much trouble. Finally Darkness Prevails closes things with more Kraftwerkian electronica and serious vocoding. Despite the pessimistic name this mostly instrumental seems to speak with some hope to me for a bright future if we want it.

Overall its a more harder edged album than the previous but unfortunately theres no Wasted Time or Angels In Disguise tracks on this one although to be honest those were standout excellent tracks, Angels being my favourite by some way.

Its a strong listenable album and one worth trying out. Lets hope this one isnt deleted before it even gets released!

Shrike @ RemixWars

DJ Copper Top
INTERFACE: Beyond Humanity - I am SO GLAD these guys got signed!! I have some of their original stuff from way back in 2000 and 2001. Drive and determination got these guys there, and true talent. This is a true album, mixing it up with trancey instrumentals, synthpop, electro, intelligent experimental, and a splash of EBM. Eat it up.

Review by DJ Copper Top


 

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